About Exhibition Tea Utensils: Old and New What is an Occidental Teahouse? Tea Heart, Tea Mind: Are either a chemical trait? Gallic Perfume: Proust and Tea in French Culture Wabi: the tea esthetic re-examined Temae: Procedure, Performance, Continuity in Change Explore the way of tea: Links on WWW Found Materials in Context
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Thé: une ceremonie d'infusion - Aprille Best Glover - Renior Museum August thru October 2002
   Detail: Host Area before tea ceremony. In choosing utensils for the tea ceremonies at the Renoir Museum the overriding concideration was to find objects that were both functional and wabi-like from local sources. Traditionally the choice of utensils has always been seen as a personal reflection of a tea master and continuously evolving process dependent on the occasion and season. The utensils have diverse origins. Some were created from natural materials found in the Provencal landscape. Certain object were mined from the detritus of the French Rivera urban life and the gobal consumer in which it is immersed. Still other utensils spring from the conceptual inception years before.The overarching stradegy is to find site-specific equivalants that serve this occidental tea ceremony both functionally and esthetically.

In the tea-room the fear of repetition is a constant presence. The various objects for the decoration of a room should be so selected that no colour or design shall be repeated. If you have a living flower, a painting of flowers is not allowable... in order to break any suggestion of monotony in the room.
                        - Okakura Kakuzo. from the Book of Tea


Waterjar 2002 Native stone.

Detail Waterjar Aprille Best Glover 2002.
    The water jug was sculpted from a natural sandstone found in hillside above the installation site. Mottled white in color, the jar picks up the natural changes in light over the day. The cap is from a smaller stone found adjacent cliff face. Note the juxtaposition between the smooth polished interior and top and the rough unworked surface of the exterior. The water jug hold approximately 2 liters of water.

There is a harmonious juxaposition between natural scallops shell (Left and below) and the named teabowls* made from ceramic containers used for yoplait yogurt. The packaging is part of a larger advertising campain in France. The slogan, saveur d'autrefois, (taste of other times) refers to both yoplait's old fashion taste and to a simpler time when all yogurt was sold in ceramic pots. Sea shells are commonly used in France for sea food dishes but not as plate for any other type of food. The scallop shape is echoed in the madeliene cake. The shape's iconographic significance is connected in both the shell and the desert to spiritual pilgrimage, particularly to pilgrims traveling thru France to tomb of St. James in Santiago, Spain.



Above.Mobile Trunk with utensils immediately before commencement. Tea utensil were on-site during a tea ceremonies. Musée Renoir. 2002
The artist perfomed teas only on a limited number of days during the two month exhibition, all the utensils fit inside a refurbished mobile trunk. The trunk served as mobil preperation area to one side of the teahouse. You can see in the open trunk (opposite) on the upper left the box holding the scallop plate (details above). Below left is a plastic container for the madelienes (see details of madelienes above). To the right in the photo opposite is a wicker tray. On the slideing shelf is the wrapped tea caddy. Even the towels for clean up were found. They are strips of linen dating from the 1920's found in an abandoned property. Not pictured is the box bellow holding the wine opener, olives and wine glasses. The top of that box is also the serving tray the wine and olives (see below)

Detail: Fukusa. 2002
Even the silk fukusa (see left) is recycled from dicarded clothing. The fukusa is a special cloth used for symbolicalic "purification" of utensils such as the tea-caddy and water laddle by carefully wiping each in the prescribed way; thus deepen host's concentration and guest's tranquility. It is protected from touching the pebbles below by a carefully cleaned tire tread. The tea canister is wrapped with a very inexpensive napkin (see right and below) with a typical almost kitch Provencal pattern. These are common to local souvenir shops that cater to tourists.
Detail: Tea Caddy. 2002

Wrapping (tsutsumu) or tying / binding (musubu) things has special meaning in the context of Japanese ritual and belief, signifying not only enveloping articles with a covering but demarcating it as important and/or sacred. The implication of tsutsumu is it that marks objects as pure and clean and separates them from dirt or defilement. Furthermore, tsutsumu derives from the word tsutsushimu, which means to be both discreet and restrained, and to show reverence. Tsusumu, or wrapping things, is done not only to keep them clean and protect them from harm, but also to express respect. Notice below right the box for the water laddle made from vegetable crates from the local mark.
Detail: Tea Caddy. 2002                      

A local rosé wine and olives were served while guests waited for the water to boil. The low ceramic bowls are packaging for cheese. Like the tea bowls make from yogurt pots, these contemporary ready-mades are in the spirit of Duchamp and Rikyu. Many of the bowls preferred by the early tea masters were not originally produced as tea bowls, but as mukozuki (rice bowls). Generally these are the tea bowls which have a foot diameter larger than sixty percent of the overall diameter. These bowls were hastily made either by peasants for their own use or to be sold to peasants at quite low prices.

"Tea should not be an exhibition of what the tea man owns. Instead the sincerity of his heart should be expressed. "

- Sen Rikyu

  


Packaging from a popular soap commonly found in Provence repurposed as a kensui (waste water bowl).

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About Exhibition Tea Utensils: Old and New What is an Occidental Teahouse? Tea Heart, Tea Mind: Are either a chemical trait? Gallic Perfume: Proust and Tea in French Culture Wabi: the tea esthetic re-examined Temae: Procedure, Performance, Continuity in Change Explore the way of tea: Links on WWW Found Materials in Context
  [Home]*[Current Project]*[ Memory of a guest that lingers...]*[Alchemic Light]*[Poetics]*[Open Secrets]*[Archived Site]*[Contact]

                      This site and all original contents are copyrighted ® 2000-2003 Aprille GLOVER. All rights reserved.


Each teabowl is named by a jeu du mot on the four seasons. Back

Source - fr. a spring or nature water source.

Source -
name of cup 1 of set, Saveur Autrefois. 2003. Readymade.
Les T - fr. phonic spelling of l'eté (summer).

Les T - name of cup 2 of set, Saveur Autrefois. 2003. Readymade.
Chute - fr. a fall or cascade of water .

Chute - name of cup 3 of set, Saveur Autrefois. 2003. Readymade.
I Vert - fr. phonic spelling of hiver (winter).

I Vert - name of cup 4 of set, Saveur Autrefois. 2003. Readymade.
About Exhibition Tea Utensils: Old and New What is an Occidental Teahouse? Tea Heart, Tea Mind: Are either a chemical trait? Gallic Perfume: Proust and Tea in French Culture Wabi: the tea esthetic re-examined Temae: Procedure, Performance, Continuity in Change Explore the way of tea: Links on WWW Found Materials in Context
  [Home]*[Current Project]*[ Memory of a guest that lingers...]*[Alchemic Light]*[Poetics]*[Open Secrets]*[Archived Site]*[Contact]

                      This site and all original contents are copyrighted ® 2000-2003 Aprille GLOVER. All rights reserved.
In choosing utensils for the tea ceremonies at the Renoir Museum the overriding principle was to find objects that were both functional and wabi-like from local sources. Traditionally the choice of utensils has always been seen as a personal reflection of a tea master and continuously evolving process dependent on the occasion and season.....

continued ...